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Rain with Different Frames.2017.300dpi_smaller_web.ccoe

This is one of my new paintings, Rain With Different Frames, 9″ x 7″, made with watercolor, ink and pastel.  My work moves in organic directions; I draw or paint what is authentically in my vision at the time, and stay very open to whatever else could surprisingly evolve. The themes take form as characters and textural atmospheres, both of equal importance, which relates my conviction that we are a part of this world, and it is a part of us. That is spiritual to me. When I am asked what inspires me, the “what” for me is found wherever my life is, or where my mind has wondered while reading a news article, researching, observing my children, listening to a song, walking through a temperate rain forest… the wondering finds me again in my studio.

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Rain with Different Frames.2017.300dpi.detail1.ccoe

Each work contains story lines woven together to form a whole narrative. Though the drawings and paintings may be fantastical in appearance, I feel they also contain metaphorical expressions that embody every day experiences.

And mysteries too.

Below is another new work. A miniature. This is The Appearance, 4 5/8″ x 4 1/8″, watercolor, ink and pastel.

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You can find both of these works and others at my website, http://charmagnecoe.com.

Thank you for reading! Have a lovely weekend.

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It is with great excitement that I announce my debut Phoenix solo exhibition in September at the wonderful contemporary gallery, Chartreuse. You are invited!

The Reaches

Opening Reception, First Friday, September 1st, 6pm – 10pm
Closing Reception, Third Friday, September 14th, 6pm – 10pm
Additional showings on Saturdays 2nd and 16th, 10am – 3pm

Music by Alan Jones. Refreshments.

Chartreuse, 1301 Grand Ave 2b, Phoenix, AZ 85007

 

This large body of expressive surrealistic paintings was created in watercolor, ink and pastel. Each one in some way embodies the show’s title, The Reaches, with themes of connectedness and holism. Most of the paintings have never been shown before. Several new works from this year are included, both framed, and rawly, unframed — though it may be a bit shocking to have some delicate pastel work exposed without glass, they’re going to be living on the edge. My process involves organically, spontaneously allowing the colors, textures and story to evolve before me. My inspiration occurs in recognizing that all of us are parts of deeply interconnected experiences and then, from that vantage point, pursuing creative ideas within subjects such as biophilia (human innate need to connect with nature), mythology, pathos or the collective unconscious.  It is such a pleasure to work and collaborate with agent/curator, Nicole Royse, and owner of Chartreuse, Nancy Hill. You may RSVP here at Facebook.

Chartreuse

I deeply look forward to this opportunity to meet others in my community and share my work. Hope to see you there!

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It is a distinct pleasure to announce that I am now represented by Nicole Royse in Phoenix, AZ. As an art consultant and agent, Nicole has a stellar reputation for assisting clients and gallerists in locating art that is a superb fit for their collections and exhibitions. Nicole works tirelessly as a vanguard of the contemporary art movement in Phoenix. You can find out more about our work together, contact information and upcoming exhibitions at https://www.nicoleroyse.com/.

This is a new painting. The Season, 2017, 7 1/8″ x 9 3/8″, watercolor, ink and pastel.

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Detail images:

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Summer has been full of  family adventures and productive creativity. When I’m in my home studio during the day (night painting is oh-so-much-quieter), they run in and out after swimming or skateboarding. It’s a fairly frenetic balancing act. But it works. My youngest son has recently been apt to make an artistic suggestion or two. He sees a puzzled look on my face as I stand before a painting, and asks:  “Are you stuck? Do you need some help?” He is so charming (he really is), how do I say no? Surprisingly, more than once, his input is intuitively spot on. Just the other morning, he told me I might like to paint a creature in the corner of one of my WIP’s. He’s helping me write the story….

Here are some bits from my latest projects.

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It’s been extremely rewarding to pursue some new palettes this month and attend to several projects. Below are two of four paintings in progress, and I’m beginning another one today… I woke up thinking of rich indigo and filigree-like white lace. I’ll see where the spark takes me.

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Having several concurrent paintings in progress affords me the ability to step back from one when I need to but also keep working on others. It’s important for me, and many other visual artists/writers, I’ve heard, to avoid developing myopia. As well, a kind of block can develop when all one’s hopes are tied to a single project — particularly one that is large and inundating. That happened to me several years ago while doing a large commission. At points, I felt completely overwhelmed; when I got to a puzzling element I would fixate on it and become mired. Time ticked away. I’d paint something that didn’t work, paint it over, then over again. Trickles of self-doubt began to form. Hitting the wall, my efforts became forced, which is anathema to my automatistic, spontaneous flow of creativity I need to create work that is truly alive, surprising and authentic. In frustration I found myself breaking away and taking out a sketchbook. I began drawing unrelated projects and it extinguished my anxiety. What emerged were some of my best drawings AND I returned to the large commission feeling rejuvenated, fueled and having fresh eyes. Time-wise too, it was crucial that I met the deadline, and thankfully I did! It was a learning curve.

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I’ve since utilized this healthy discovery in creative process and I make sure to explore art in several directions at once. Not to an overwhelming degree, but just enough so that the projects are mutually beneficial as a whole. Each venture is informing the other, whether on a conscious or subconscious level. When a piece falls flat, I don’t trouble over it as much as I used to. Instead, I usually set it aside (I will often resurrect it later) and get to painting or drawing or writing something else. One creation is happily percolating while another creation is reaching a satisfying completion. I read along the way that “art feeds art”. It’s true.

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The above painting, Windows Watch Us In, is the focus of my April art column installment, Honey Wove the Marrow, at Arcadia Magazine’s Online Sundries. In it I discuss identity, relating and a bit about fishing with my dad.

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Here is a detail from the work in progress for Essential Creatures, an exhibition honoring the pollinators of our world. It will be at West of the Moon Gallery, 14 N. San Francisco St., Flagstaff, AZ 86001. (928) 774-0465. The open reception is April 3rd, 2015, First Friday, 6-9 pm and is ongoing through April.

Honey Wove the Marrow, by Charmagne Coe
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The above work, Honey Wove the Marrow, was started back in September 2014. I worked on this for a couple of months, but I hit a wall and couldn’t go on with it. So… I let it sit for a while, worked on other projects, then returned to it just last month. What was needed came together after that long, deep breath. I’ve written more about it in my first installment of the eponymous art column, Honey Wove the Marrow, at Arcadia Magazine’s Online Sundries. Included is a story from my childhood.

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This week, I’m excited to be featured in an article in Arizona Foothills Magazine Blog. It was very thoughtfully written by Nicole Royse. Thank you! You can visit it here.

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I am so, so relieved to be in a routine flow around my new art space. As a creature of habit in my immediate surroundings, change definitely unsettles me. But it is ultimately an invigorating, cathartic experience. My new studio is a shared space with other family activities. Sometimes I find myself creating in conjunction with all manner of  commotion buzzing around me. I think again (as I do so often) about childhood with my father as a jeweler. He worked out of our house. He had an intensity of persistence and focus as he built exquisite pieces of fine jewelry in a home studio, and later a converted garage. Life did not stop around him, nor did he expect it to. We were just asked to be respectful. I think about the cacophony of a day, but never felt like I was an intrusive part of his process. In fact, I was sometimes asked to assist him in arranging and stringing beads or other tasks. I loved that purposeful feeling of being at my father’s knee with all those colors, shapes and textures in my hands. I was a part of something that was being made. Many facets of life coexisted together. In some ways, now is very much like my childhood then. Part and parcel.

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I recently reread the in-your-face poem (imagine that!) by Charles Bukowski,  “Air and Light and Time and Space”, that is an affront to writers who incessantly look for the perfect conditions to evoke their productivity. It gave me pause for thought. Here are some lines:

baby, air and light and time and space
have nothing to do with it
and don’t create anything
except maybe a longer life to find
new excuses
for.

Together Go the Elements.2015.drawing.300dpi.ccoe
Together Go The Elements, ink drawing

Take care and feel all that is around you.

work in progress for pollination show, by Charmagne Coe

This is a large painting I started a couple of weeks ago. It is made with layers of watercolor, ink and pastel. Look at the outline of that … is it a bird, or?? This is one of those works that gently, sort of effortlessly unfolds. Already, I can see there will be multiple characters and plot twists. I had not intended it to be themed in any direction or for a particular show, but last night, out of the blue, I realized it would be just perfect for an upcoming group exhibition which focuses on pollinators. The show will happen at West of the Moon Gallery on April 3rd, Flagstaff First Friday Art Walk. But now that I’ve written it, I’m going to forget about times and dates and all that, and think about… paint. I’m excited. Can you tell?

When Suddenly, drawing by Charmagne Coe

Here is a piece from yesterday, When Suddenly, 2015, ink drawing on tan paper.

snippet of discarded painting, by Charmagne Coe
Not everything goes as planned, of course, but often there are elements of a painting that are just right, or that contain a nudge, or a hint, be it ever so small, of something I feel good about. And so I save those. I take out the scissors and snip out what I know I’ll miss otherwise. Those are like micro inspirations. Above is one such “snippet”. I found it hanging out under some glassine. As I look at it, if feels like this is its very own painting that’s simply unfinished. We shall see.

Thanks for popping in. Thanks all for the kind comments and adding me to your reader. Take care.

I’ve been working glacially, quietly on several larger works simultaneously. Here are some snaps for you. This painting, as my others, are composed with watercolor, ink and pastel and is 18 7/8″ x 18 1/4″.

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You can glimpse the next one at the bottom, even larger, that I am returning to this week. I see there a woman on the edge of… I don’t know yet. I started it months ago and have been so enamored by the initial layers, that I’ve been rather cautious to touch it just yet. The next steps needed to percolate for a while. But, I believe it’s time to jump in. If you were at the live painting at the Renaissance Hotel, this is the work in progress I had on the easel.

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Here’s a closer look:

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The following are ink drawings I finished recently.

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I felt lavished and nurtured today upon reading Anais Nin’s following thoughts on the artistic process of writing.

“You must not fear, hold back, count or be a miser with your thoughts and feelings. It is also true that creation comes from an overflow, so you have to learn to intake, to imbibe, to nourish yourself and not be afraid of fullness. The fullness is like a tidal wave which then carries you, sweeps you into experience and into writing. Permit yourself to flow and overflow, allow for the rise in temperature, all the expansions and intensifications. Something is always born of excess: great art was born of great terrors, great loneliness, great inhibitions, instabilities, and it always balances them.”

This is a song from one of my painting playlists – “Saudade”, by Love and Rockets. It is set to a black and white video created by António Vasques de Azevedo.

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